HBCUs in North Carolina: The Best Online Degree Programs

Best Online Degree Programs at HBCUs in North Carolina

At Best Online HBCUs, we provide comprehensive, unbiased information of the best online undergraduate and graduate degree programs at HBCUs across the United States and HBCUs in North Carolina. North Carolina has 136 degree-granting institutions. The state is home to 17 public, 4-year institutions, 58 public, 2-year institutions, 48 private non-profit, 4-year institutions, one private non-profit, 2-year institution, 8 private for-profit, 4-year institutions, and 4 private for-profit, 2-year institutions. There were 488,740 undergraduate students enrolled in associate's and bachelor's degrees, and 74,970 students enrolled in master's and doctoral degrees in fall 2018.

Of the 136 institutions, 10 are HBCUs. These 10 institutions enrolled 38,959 students: 34,147 in undergraduate programs and 4,812 in graduate programs. All of the North Carolina HBCUs are listed below. Take your time to discover more about each institution and what they can offer for your career objectives. Since we are focused on distance education, we have provided more details about the best online degree programs at those institutions.

Bennett College

Online Degree Programs

There are currently no online programs listed for Bennett College

In 1873, Bennett College had its beginning in the unplastered basement of the Warnersville Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1874 the Freedmen’s Aid Society took over the school which remained under its auspices for 50 years. Within five years of 1873, a group of emancipated slaves purchased the present site for the school. In 1926, The Women’s Home Missionary Society joined with the Board of Education of the church to make Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C., formerly co-educational, a college for women.

For nearly 150 years women have found Bennett to be the ideal place to foster the constant rhythm of ideas. Each student’s individual need for self-expression and desire for achievement is constantly nurtured. The College fosters a strong respect for every student.

Private Non-Profit, 4-Year

Sector

534

 Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Graduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Graduate Enrollments

Elizabeth City State University

Online Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science in Homeland Security

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies

Master of Education in Elementary Education

On March 3, 1891, Hugh Cale, an African-American representative in the N.C. General Assembly from Pasquotank County, sponsored House Bill 383, which established a normal (teaching) school for “teaching and training teachers of the colored race to teach in the common schools of North Carolina.” The bill passed, and the origin of Elizabeth City State University, one of ten HBCUs in North Carolina, was born. The institution’s first name was Elizabeth City State Colored Normal School (1891-1939).

Public, 4-Year

Sector

1,636

 Undergraduate Enrollments

41

Graduate Enrollments

156

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

1

Online Graduate Enrollments

Fayetteville State University

Online Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Bachelor of Science in Birth through Kindergarten

Bachelor of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science in Fire & Emergency Services Administration

Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence Studies

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

Bachelor of Science in Professional Studies

Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Bachelor of Science in Sociology

Master of Science in Criminal Justice

Master of Business Administration

Master of Science in Nursing

Master of Arts in Psychology

Master of Arts in Sociology

Senate Bill Number 472, known as the “Act to establish normal schools,” which was ratified on March 8, 1877 by the state Senate, provided for the establishment of a teacher training institution for whites and one for blacks in North Carolina. One was established at UNC Chapel Hill and the Howard School was selected over fourteen other schools in North Carolina as the first State Colored Normal School, and also became one of the first public normal schools for blacks in the South.

The name changed to Fayetteville State College in 1963. Students participated in the Civil Rights Movement and were the catalyst for the desegregation of downtown businesses. Both the faculty and student body were integrated. In 1969, the College was named Fayetteville State University, and designated as a regional university by an act of the legislature.

Public, 4-Year

Sector

5,473

 Undergraduate Enrollments

845

Graduate Enrollments

1,510

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

549

Online Graduate Enrollments

Johnson C Smith University

Online Degree Programs

There are currently no online programs listed for Johnson C Smith University

In 1867, the Rev. S.C. Alexander and the Rev. W. L. Miller saw the need to establish an institution in this section of the South. On April 7, 1867, at a meeting of the Catawba Presbytery in the old Charlotte Presbyterian Church, the movement for the school was formally inaugurated, which by charter was named The Freedmen’s College of North Carolina.

The late Jane Berry Smith, of Pittsburgh, Pa., gave funds to build a theological dormitory, science hall, teachers’ cottage and memorial gate. She provided a handsome endowment for the institution in memory of her late husband, Johnson C. Smith. In recognition of these gifts, the board of trustees changed the name of the institution to Johnson C. Smith University.

Private Non-Profit, 4-Year

Sector

1,480

 Undergraduate Enrollments

85

Graduate Enrollments

63

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Graduate Enrollments

Livingstone College

Online Degree Programs

There are currently no online programs listed for Livingstone College

Livingstone College, one of ten HBCUs in North Carolina, was founded as Zion Wesley Institute by a group of A.M.E. Zion ministers for the purpose of training ministers in the Cabarrus County town of Concord, North Carolina in 1879. In 1881, Dr. Joseph Charles Price and Bishop J. W. Hood changed their roles as delegates to the Ecumenical Conference and became fund-raisers with the mission to re-establish Zion Wesley Institute.

The Rowan County town of Salisbury, just 20 miles northeast of Concord, gave the Trustees a generous donation of $1,000 and an invitation to relocate the school in Salisbury. They accepted both gifts, and the College re-opened in Salisbury in 1882 with Dr. Price as President. The new site was J. M. Gray’s farm called Delta Grove, which consisted of one building and 40 acres of land.

Private Non-Profit, 4-Year

Sector

1,148

 Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Graduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Graduate Enrollments

North Carolina A & T State University

Online Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education

Bachelor of Science in Business Information Technology

Bachelor of Science in Economics

Bachelor of Science in Electronics Technology

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health & Safety

Bachelor of Science in Geomatics

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies (African American Studies)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

Master of Science in Agricultural Education

Master of Business Administration

Master of Science in Information Technology

Master of Arts in Teaching: Biology Education; Business Education; Chemistry Education; Elementary Education; English Education; Family and Consumer Sciences; History Education; Mathematics Education; or Technology Education

Master of Science in Technology Management

Doctor of Philosophy in Leadership Studies

North Carolina A&T has a long and rich history as a university and has played a significant role in the struggle for civil rights for African Americans in the United States. In 1891, the college is established with the intention “to teach practical agriculture and mechanic arts and such branches of learning as relate there to, not excluding academic and classical instruction” to African American citizens of North Carolina.

In 1957, the college becomes “Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina,” and the North Carolina General Assembly redefines the purpose of A&T: “to teach the Agricultural and Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning as related thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the public schools of the State, including the preparation of such teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the Master’s Degree.”

In 1960, Ezell Blair, Jr. (Jibreel Khazan), Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil and David Richmond, four freshman students at A&T College, initiate the Lunch Counter Sit-In demonstrations in Greensboro on February 1st. They become known as The A&T Four, and their non-violent protest starts a wave of similar sit-ins that play a key role in raising awareness of and ending segregation in North Carolina and across the south.

Public, 4-Year

Sector

10,629

 Undergraduate Enrollments

1,513

Graduate Enrollments

701

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

367

Online Graduate Enrollments

North Carolina Central University

Online Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Environmental and Geographic Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Behavioral and Social Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality and Tourism Administration

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Master of Arts in Career Counseling

Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Master of Arts in Educational Technology

Master of Arts in Information Science

Master in Library Science

Master of Arts in Teaching

Master of School Administration

Master of Science in Higher Education Administration

Master of Science in Mathematics – Data Science

Master of Science Mathematics

Master of Science Mathematics – Computational and Engineering Mathematics

Master of Arts in School Counseling

Dr. James E. Shepard, a successful businessman who was thought to be one of the wealthiest African Americans in the United States during the early 1900s, opened the doors of the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race on July 5, 1910. In doing so, he boldly declared its purpose to be “the development in young men and women of the character and sound academic training requisite for real service to the nation.”

The institution was sold and reorganized in 1915 as the National Training School. The first four-year class graduated on June 6, 1929. In 1923, the North Carolina state legislature converted the institution into the North Carolina College for Negroes and dedicated it to liberal arts education and the preparation of teachers and principals. The college thus became the nation’s first state-supported liberal arts college for black students.

Today, North Carolina Central University, one of ten HBCUs in North Carolina, with a strong tradition of teaching, research, and service, prepares students to become global leaders and practitioners who transform communities.

Public, 4-Year

Sector

6,434

 Undergraduate Enrollments

1,773

Graduate Enrollments

648

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

415

Online Graduate Enrollments

Saint Augustine's University

Online Degree Programs

There are currently no online programs listed for Saint Augustine’s University

Saint Augustine’s University was chartered as Saint Augustine Normal School and Collegiate Institute on July 19, 1867, by the Reverend J. Brinton Smith, D.D., secretary of the Freedman’s Commission of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and the Right Reverend Thomas Atkinson, D.D., Bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina. The new school opened its doors for instruction on January 13, 1868.

In 1893, the School’s name changed from Saint Augustine Normal School to Saint Augustine’s School. In 1919, the name changed to Saint Augustine’s Junior College, the first year in which postsecondary instruction was offered. The School became a four-year institution in 1927. In 1928, the institution was renamed Saint Augustine’s College. Baccalaureate degrees were first awarded in 1931.

Private Non-Profit, 4-Year

Sector

767

 Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Graduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

N/A

Online Graduate Enrollments

Shaw University

Online Degree Programs

There are currently no online programs listed for Shaw University

Shaw University, one of ten HBCUs in North Carolina, located in Raleigh, North Carolina is the first historically Black institution of higher education in the South and among the oldest in the nation. The University was founded in 1865 by Henry Martin Tupper, a native of Monson, Massachusetts, a soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War, and a graduate of Amherst College and Newton Theological Seminary.

Shaw boasts many “firsts”: the first college in the nation to offer a four-year medical program, the first historically Black college in the nation to open its doors to women, and the first historically Black college in North Carolina to be granted an “A” rating by the State Department of Public Instruction.

Private Non-Profit, 4-Year

Sector

1,305

 Undergraduate Enrollments

106

Graduate Enrollments

114

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

22

Online Graduate Enrollments

Winston-Salem State University

Online Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN)

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Integrative Studies

Bachelor of Science in Birth to Kindergarten Education

Master of Healthcare Administration

Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling

Master of Science in Nursing, Advanced Nurse Educator

Doctor of Physical Therapy (For those with a Bachelor or Masters in Physical Therapy)

Winston-Salem State University was founded as the Slater Industrial Academy by Simon Green Atkins on September 28, 1892. Atkins had an audacious vision to create an institution where every student would meet the challenges of the day equipped with an education designed to intellectually prepare the “head, hand, and heart.” Twenty-five students attended classes in a one-room frame structure and were taught by a single instructor.

In 1925, the General Assembly of North Carolina recognized the school’s curriculum above high school, changed its name to Winston-Salem Teachers College, and empowered it under authority of the State Board of Education to confer appropriate degrees. Winston-Salem Teachers College thus became the first black institution in the nation to grant degrees for teaching the elementary grades.

Public, 4-Year

Sector

4,741

 Undergraduate Enrollments

449

Graduate Enrollments

619

Online Undergraduate Enrollments

117

Online Graduate Enrollments

Why get a degree from an HBCU?